Category Archives: Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel

“Learner-Centered Pedagogy”Book Now Available for Pre-order!

Dani and I have been relatively quiet about this, but we have a book coming out from ALA Editions, and it’s now available for pre-order.

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Here is a short synopsis of the book’s first chapter from the introduction, which gives a sense of the core thesis of the book in broad outline:

The overall thesis of this book is that learner-centered pedagogy involves taking seriously the idea that who we are as people matters in the context of learning. We’ve organized the book into six main chapters; each chapter builds on this core idea. In the first chapter, we introduce a working definition of learner-centered pedagogy drawn from the education literature, counseling psychology, and previous work on learner- centered teaching. We follow the pioneering “person-centered” vision of humanistic psychologist and educator Carl Rogers in placing empathy as central to humanistic education and therapies, by placing the concept of empathy at the heart of learner-centered librarianship. We therefore pose, “What is it like to be a person learning something?” as the central question of the book, which we partially answer in each of the following chapters. Finally, we reframe information literacy to be an explicitly learner-centered concept that involves learners using information to think well about what matters to them. This definition of information literacy will inform the practical strategies suggested in the rest of the book.

So there it is: essentially we aim for a “person-centered” approach to teaching research grounded in empathy, by which we mean that the central question for learner centered librarians to consider is, “What is it like to be a person learning something?” For example, the first chapter considers the educational and psychological research on “What is it like to be a person learning something from a motivational perspective?” It turns out that there’s a ton of empirical evidence on questions like this. So we consider:  What does the empirical research say about what makes people want to learn something, and, given this research, what concrete strategies can we use as information literacy educators to tailor our instruction to learners’ motivational needs?

Thus, our goal is to help librarians help learners use information to think well about what matters to them by providing theoretical and practical tools librarians can use to facilitate learning that places the learner’s own experience at the center of our teaching. Subsequent chapters consider different elements of what it’s like to be a learner, e.g., from a cognitive standpoint. As we fill out our picture, we’ve tried to present an entire learner centered approach to teaching info lit that’s not only based in the empirical evidence about learning, but also fundamentally grounded in the nature of what it means to be a human being.

I’m extremely pleased with the book, and look forward to it being available.

Let us know if you have any questions; we’re happy to answer them.

The book is available for pre-order via ALA’s website and you can also pre-order the book from Amazon. It looks like it should be out by June 22nd.

 

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Filed under Bibliographic Instruction is Dead, Education, Library Instruction, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel

An Opportunity to Directly Support Public Library Education

My friend from library school Laina Stapleton is now a school librarian in North Carolina and is in need of a little funding support to better the lives of her students. Before I say more about that, let me say something real quick about Laina. When I was in library school I, quite literally, thought I was going to fail out every semester. During my first year we were required to take a computer skills course, which included things like basic programming where we had to built a website. I was absolutely lost in this class, was struggling to build a website, and was hopeless at coding. Laina sat near me, and though she barely knew me, took absolute mercy on my soul and helped me through the whole process even though she barely knew me. She just did it because I was struggling. She is, you see, a good person.

Laina’s school is now looking for a little help to turn their library into a dynamic, 21st Century learner-centered environment. Here’s a little bit of info about Laina’s students:

We serve a large, diverse group of students in a mixed urban-rural setting. Many of them come from low socio-economic families; this area of our school system is the poorest. They are historically underserved and are a high immigrant population; we have students from Ukraine, Russia, Moldova, Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Samoa and other Pacific Islands, Romania, Albania, and the highest population of Micronesians in our county. They bring their cultures, backgrounds, and experiences to school, creating a fairly unique learning environment that the library is truly the center of.

They visit the library of their own accord to 3D print, check out board games, socialize, access technology, talk books and reading, and as a safe space in an environment that can be volatile at times. They want to learn, to meet our high expectations, and are smart enough to recognize when we aren’t doing all that we can to help and encourage them and notice when things aren’t up to par.

Donations will directly support student learning in the library:

Our library has been undergoing a change beginning two years ago when both librarians arrived new to the school. Last year, we wrote a Five Year Collection Development and Library Management Plan. One of the goals is to update the physical appearance of the library to bring it into the 21st century and support our 1:1 program. We see an average of 120 students during our open tutorial period, 3 classes, and 17 individual students per day. Our furniture is approximately 30 years old and no longer viable for our programming.

It’s a wonderful proposal for a great person, so please donate to a cause that will really benefit the educational experience of North Carolina’s children. In this difficult political climate where many of us are not sure what we can do or how we can facilitate change, donations such as these, however small, can make a huge and direct impact onchildren’s education.

You can read more about Laina’s proposal (including a detailed breakdown of how donations will be spent) here.

UPDATE: The funding goal on this project has been reached; thanks to those of you who donated. You the real MVP’s.

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Filed under Education, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Reading & Literacy

Libraries and Critical Thinking: No Better Time Than Now

It is a depressing time to be both an American and a person who thinks that facts matter. We have a President who denies the reality of climate change; claims that performing a study into whether voter fraud occurred is in and of itself grounds for concluding that voter fraud occurred; and, of course, prefers “alternative facts” [sic] when the way the world actually is turns out not to be in his liking. Donald Trump’s world is a zero sum game where if you’re not a winner you’re a loser, and there’s no grey area between terrific and disaster. And this is, like, the first week.

But though Trump is as pernicious an enemy to critical thinking as we’ve seen in quite some time, this current state of affairs provides librarians with an opportunity to (re)establish ourselves as educators whose primary business is helping learners distinguish fact from fiction. Carl Rogers once said that when doing research “the facts are friendly.” I can think of no better credo for the information literacy enterprise, and no better message that we could hope to deliver to our students.

Librarians, I’ve always believed, are in the very business of evidence: we teach learners how to use reliable information so they can construct their beliefs based on the best evidence available to them. Whether helping a student find an article in a database; learn how to cite something in MLA; or write an annotated bibliography, all our efforts boil down to helping learners base their beliefs on the evidence.

The present situation affords us a unique opportunity to use our creative powers to make this expertise explicit, and help both students and other campus faculty see our value in the realm of critical thinking. There are any number of ways to do this that fall squarely within the realm of librarianship. And the best ways, in my opinion, will be lessons that maintain our neutrality in the face of politics and and our allegiance to the facts, whatever they may happen to be. Facts are not political, no matter what this, or any other government administration may prefer you to believe.

 

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Filed under Bibliographic Instruction is Dead, Education, Library Instruction, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Uncategorized

Everything is Fucked … The Class

Interesting:

In a much-discussed article at Slate, social psychologist Michael Inzlicht told a reporter, “Meta-analyses are fucked” (Engber, 2016). What does it mean, in science, for something to be fucked? Fucked needs to mean more than that something is complicated or must be undertaken with thought and care, as that would be trivially true of everything in science. In this class we will go a step further and say that something is fucked if it presents hard conceptual challenges to which implementable, real-world solutions for working scientists are either not available or routinely ignored in practice.

The format of this seminar is as follows: Each week we will read and discuss 1-2 papers that raise the question of whether something is fucked. Our focus will be on things that may be fucked in research methods, scientific practice, and philosophy of science. The potential fuckedness of specific theories, research topics, etc. will not be the focus of this class per se, but rather will be used to illustrate these important topics. To that end, each week a different student will be assigned to find a paper that illustrates the fuckedness (or lack thereof) of that week’s topic, and give a 15-minute presentation about whether it is indeed fucked.

I took a few classes in library school that could have been titled this, but I don’t think it was intentional.

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Filed under Education, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Uncategorized

LC vs. Dewey?

Question for academic librarians: As a reference and instruction librarian, do you prefer the LC or Dewey classification systems? I mean this specifically from the student perspective: do you find that one or the other is easier for students to understand?

For most of my time working in libraries, I worked in libraries that used LC, but I’m now working for the first time in an academic library that uses Dewey. And my entirely unscientific, anecdotal sense is that students find Dewey easier to understand. It just seems to me to make more sense to them (I wonder if the explanation for this is that the fact that most letters don’t correspond to the actual letters of the subjects in LC (e.g., P isn’t Philosophy is kind of weird to students and Dewey doesn’t have to overcome that).

Thoughts based on your experience?

 

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Filed under Library Instruction, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, The Library Game

Congrats to Alex Carroll!

Huge congratulations to my friend and fellow UNC SILS library school alum Alex Carroll for   his award from the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the MLA

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for Professional Excellence by a New Health Sciences Librarian. Couldn’t happen to a more deserving librarian or a better dude. Next Pappy on me when I see you brother.

Students of the game, we passed the classes. Nobody could read you dudes like we do.

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Filed under Bibliographic Instruction is Dead, Education, Library Instruction, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Quotes, The Library Game

Libraries as Autonomy-Supportive Institutions

The librarian doesn’t tell me what to read, doesn’t tell me what sequence of reading I have to follow, doesn’t grade my reading. The librarian trusts me to have a worthwhile purpose of my own. I appreciate that and trust the library in return.

Some other significant differences between libraries and schools: the librarian lets me ask my own questions and helps me when I want help, not when she decides I need it. If I feel like reading all day long, that’s okay with the librarian, who doesn’t compel me to stop at intervals by ringing a bell in my ear. The library keeps its nose out of my home. It doesn’t send letters to my family, nor does it issue orders on how I should use my reading time at home.

The library doesn’t play favorites; it’s a democratic place as seems proper in a democracy. If the books I want are available, I get them, even if that decision deprives someone more gifted and talented than I am. The library never humiliates me by posting ranked lists of good readers. It presumes good reading is its own reward and doesn’t need to be held up as an object lesson to bad readers….

The library never makes predictions about my future based on my past reading habits. It tolerates eccentric reading because it realizes free men and women are often very eccentric.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Quotes, Reading & Literacy, The Library Game