Category Archives: Library Instruction

ALA Course Update

In two weeks, we’ll begin teaching an ALA online course based on Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been putting together the course materials, including making some videos that we hope will add a fun and personal element to the course.

As we’ve been putting this together, we’ve been thinking about everything that’s going on in the world, and how lucky we are to have salaried jobs with healthcare and stability, and we made a decision: We’re going to donate all our proceeds from the course (development and registration fees) to nonprofits that we feel are doing important and life-changing work. We’ll post our receipts here after the end of the class as a demonstration that we’ve made the donations.

We’ll be donating to:

  1. Planned Parenthood (https://www.plannedparenthood.org/)

“Planned Parenthood is a trusted health care provider, an informed educator, a passionate advocate, and a global partner helping similar organizations around the world. Planned Parenthood delivers vital reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of women, men, and young people worldwide.”

  1. United We Dream (unitedwedream.org)

“United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth led organization in the nation … We seek to address the inequities and obstacles faced by immigrant youth and believe that by empowering immigrant youth, we can advance the cause of the entire community – justice for all immigrants … United We Dream runs programs to advocate for the access to higher education: stop the deportations of undocumented youth and their parents; and strengthen alliances and support for DREAMers at the intersection of queer and immigrant rights.”

We know the course is *not* cheap, so it feels right to give back with our share of the proceeds, especially since the basic premise of our book is that people, including all their difference, matter and deserve equal rights and respect. We’re grateful to ALA for giving us the opportunity to share our work in a new format, and grateful to those who’ve signed up for the course already. We look forward to working with you in a few weeks!

-Kevin and Dani

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Filed under ...Etc., Library Instruction, Posts by Dani Brecher

Congrats, Dani!

Really nice article by UCR featuring Dani and Learner-Centered Pedagogy!

An excerpt:

“Most librarians who come out as credentialed MLSs don’t have a background in teaching, but when they come onto their job, a huge amount of their work is in teaching,” Cook explained. “We hope this book will help librarians who don’t necessarily have a background in education to put their students at the center of their work.”

Full article here.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Uncategorized

Learner-Centered Pedagogy E-Course

Dani and I are excited to announce that we’ll be partnering with ALA for a six week E-Course based on our Learner-Centered Pedagogy book, taught by … us!

The course, which is asynchronous, begins on Nov. 13, 2017. Students who register for the course will receive an electronic copy of Learner-Centered Pedagogy, and upon completion of the course will get a certificate of completion for professional development/continuing education purposes through ALA.

Here is a basic course outline:

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course, you will be able to

  • Articulate an individually developed learner-centered teaching philosophy
  • Plan and deliver a learner-centered activity for an information literacy-related outcome
  • Incorporate evidence-based practices related to autonomy, empathy, relationship rapport, and learners’ intrinsic motivation into your own reference and instructional contexts

eCourse Outline

Week 1Introduction to Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • How is learner-centered pedagogy defined and what are its theoretical and empirical bases?
  • How do we know when learning has occurred?
  • How can teacher-librarians (re)define information literacy in a learner-centered environment?

Week 2:  Facilitating Curiosity

  • How can library instructors tap into learners’ intrinsic motivation and desire for authentic self-expression to make information literacy really matter to learners?
  • Why do autonomy-supportive rather than controlling learning environments so successfully motivate learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can employ to support learners’ sense of autonomy and authenticity in the information literacy context?

Week 3: The Cognitive Science of Learning

  • What are some of the cognitive challenges that students face when learning information literacy skills?
  • How can an understanding of the cognitive science of learning improve librarians instructional design practices in and out of the classroom?
  • What are some evidence-based practical strategies librarians can take from the cognitive science of learning to better organize their instruction to help make information literacy learning stick?

Week 4: Relationships: The Heart of Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • Why do students seem to learn best with instructors that they feel connected to?
  • How have librarians historically approached the importance of the librarian-student relationship for facilitating information literacy learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can use to establish genuine connections and relationship rapport with learners in the information literacy context?

Week 5: Mindsets toward Learning

  • How does students’ attitudes toward the role intelligence plays in learning impact their motivation to learn?
  • How can we facilitate a process-oriented approach to research?
  • What best practices can librarians adopt from the mindset literature to help students who are experiencing roadblocks in their research?

Week 6: The Learner-Centered Technologist

  • What is technology and what role does it play in learner-centered information literacy instruction?
  • What practical test can librarians use to assess whether the use of a particular technology is learner-centered?
  • What evidence based strategies for using technology are recommended by the learner-centered pedagogy literature?

There’s a good bit more info available at the ALA site about registration, etc., but please feel free to get in touch personally with either Dani or myself if you have any questions about the content, etc.

We look forward to the possibility of working with you!

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“Learner-Centered Pedagogy” Recommended in American Libraries Magazine

We wanted to share something we’re quite excited by, that our book Learner-Centered Pedagogy was reviewed and recommended by Karen Muller in her “Librarian’s Library” column for American Libraries Magazine.

We’re particularly pleased that the review considers the book useful for school librarians in a K-12 educational setting: though we wrote it, in some sense, with academic librarians in mind (since we’re academic librarians), we do think that the book is applicable for all kinds of libraries, and transfers to any context where librarians are connecting with learners or other educators in some way.

Happily, the review agrees:

Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice, by Kevin Michael Klipfel and Dani Brecher Cook, is intended for academic librarians, but the concept of having empathy for the learner and what that person needs or wants to learn has broad applicability.

We promise we won’t share every review of the book, but we may share some so it’s not just us saying that we think the book is good!

Also exciting, I might add, is the column’s general focus on the importance of librarians as educational leaders.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Uncategorized

Opposing Viewpoints

I don’t generally comment on what other people in the profession are writing or blogging about (ironically,  I suppose, I don’t read any library blogs), but on my esteemed co-blogger’s twitter I came across and enjoyed this post by Lane Wilkinson on “Dealing with Both Sides in Your Library.” I liked it not just because I tend to agree with its general sentiments :re folks with morally repugnant and intellectually indefensible positions, but also because I haven’t seen a ton of discussion (though I haven’t really looked) about how dumb it is to think that “pro” vs. “con” or “for” and “against” is at all an interesting or nuanced way to think about research, debate, or anything else that is not a sporting event.

This has come up in a variety of professional contexts for me (e.g., at one job I had I was against showing freshmen the “Opposing Viewpoints” database because, well, there’s just evidence for or against a particular claim, not “opposing viewpoints, which aversion was met by horror for some other librarians) and it’s nice to see someone explaining why it’s not all that great.

More controversially, perhaps: I really like the tone (at least in this post) Lane writes with, and am glad to have people who conduct themselves that way publicly in the profession.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, The Library Game, Uncategorized

First Review of “Learner-Centered Pedagogy”!

Our publisher just sent over a link to the first review of Learner-Centered Pedagogy and it’s … a good one!

An excerpt:

Fusing theory with practice, this handbook is exceptionally organized and presented, making it a valuable and very highly recommended resource to help every practitioner connect with learners more effectively. Enhanced with the inclusion of a eight page bibliography (Directions for Further Reading) and an eleven page Index, “Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice” is an unreservedly recommended addition to college and university Library Science collections and community library staff in-service training supplemental studies reading lists.

Here’s where you can read the whole review in full, Mom.

(*Small correction to the review, if anyone cares: I’m not, as the review suggests, currently a lecturer in moral and existential philosophy at Virginia Tech – that was a past life. I’m the Instructional Design and Assessment Librarian at the University of Southern California Libraries).

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The Importance of Librarian “Congruence” for Learner-Centered Reference & Information Literacy Instruction

In my relationships with persons I have found that it does not help, in the long run, to act as though I were something that I am not. It does not help to act calm and pleasant when actually I am angry and critical. It does not help to act as though I know the answers when I do not. It does not help to act as though I were a loving person if actually, at the moment, I am hostile. It does not help for me to act as though I were full of assurance, if actually I am frightened and unsure. even on a very simple level I have found that this statement seems to hold. It does not help for me to act as though I were well when I feel ill.

What I am saying here, to put in another way, is that I have not found it to be helpful or effective in my relationships with other people to try to maintain a facade; to act in one way on the surface when I am experiencing something quite different underneath. It does not, I believe, make me helpful in my attempts to build up constructive relationships with other individuals. I would want to make clear that while I have learned this to be true, I have by no means adequately profited from it. In fact, it seems to me that most of the  mistakes I make in personal relationships, most of the times in which I fail to be of help to other individuals, can be accounted for in terms of the fact that I have, for some defensive reason, behaved in one way at a surface level, while in reality my feelings run in a contrary direction.

-Carl Rogers, from “This is Me” in On Becoming a Person: A Therapist’s View of Psychotherapy, pp. 16-17. Full chapter available here.

The third core condition of humanistic counseling is called congruence, which we understand as being authentic and genuine in our relationships with learners.  In the psychological literature, this state is often described as when what individuals are experiencing on the inside is in harmony with their outer expressions. For example, you would be congruent if you expressed joy over a Dodgers victory when you were really excited, but not if you pretended to be happy that the Dodgers lost because you were trying to impress a Yankee fan. When individuals are congruent in their relationship with another person, there is a sense of emotional realness present in the relationship, which is lacking in relationships where individuals act on either an internal or external pressure to put on a facade […]

The revolutionary American photographer Walker Evans spoke about his time teaching at Yale University, saying that his attitude toward students was, “I don’t really know a hell of a lot more than you do except I’ve been around longer and I do have experience and if I can articulate it some of it will rub off and do you some good.” Evans was straightforward with his students about his role as a facilitator of learning rather than a “sage on the stage,” positioning himself as a partner rather than an all-knowing expert. This congruence of feeling and action requires a certain amount of vulnerability, which Rogers locates as integral to learner-centered pedagogy. In “Questions I Would Ask Myself if I Were a Teacher,” Rogers states that one of the central applications of humanistic counseling to education leads him to ask himself if he has the courage to risk himself emotionally in his relationships with his students: “Do I dare to let myself deal with this boy or girl as a person, as someone I respect? Do I dare reveal myself to him and let him reveal himself to me?”Though Rogers recognizes that this may be difficult – it requires courage to reveal your true self in any interaction with another person – he nevertheless concludes that “if the relationship between myself and my students was truly a relationship between persons, much would be gained […] I could step off the pedestal of ‘teacher’ and become a facilitative learner among learners.”

Indeed, often the best learning tools we have at our disposal are simply our own experiences. The challenge [for the librarian] is to take a risk and share them in a productive way that might be helpful to another person. For instance, a few years ago Kevin met a student who had been invited to work on a psychology research project with a faculty member while still a junior. It was a huge honor for the student but also came with pressure, so the student asked to set up a time to meet with Kevin for some research help. Kevin and the student met over coffee, and as is often his tendency, he engaged the student in a discussion about his life before getting into the nitty gritty of the research project. It turned out that the student was really struggling with feelings of fraudulence. Most of the kids in his research methods class were white students who he felt “really fit in,” so of course they’d be asked to do research! But why had this professor asked him – the student described himself as just a Mexican kid from the middle of nowhere – to be a research collaborator?

It was a true moment of rapport, not only because the student felt free to share a deeply vulnerable piece of himself, but also because Kevin had felt the exact same way so many times in his life. He too had felt like school was not a place for “someone like him”: a “bad” kid who never seemed to fit in. These feelings of fraudulence continued, and even increased, the further he progressed in his education. Kevin not only expressed that he related to how the student felt, but also shared some of his own experiences. He talked about his high school experiences of being told to drop out of school, his feelings attending schools where the vast majority of students were wealthier, and having grown up with a single mother who worked as a waitress while attending graduate school herself.

In this case, sharing certain elements of personal experience led to congruence of emotion for both of them and helped the learner feel unconditional positive regard from the librarian after sharing challenging feelings. They discussed how they didn’t have to change their innermost selves just because they were working on research in a college setting and that their backgrounds could even be an asset in imagining interesting research projects. In this way, revealing certain personal experiences helped to facilitate a significant learning interaction […]

We hope to make clear that being vulnerable with a student in a learning context does not require sharing either things you deem inappropriate to share (things that would be too personal, which are hard to articulate but, like with the test for pornography, you know it when you see it), or things you feel emotionally vulnerable with sharing (for whatever reason). In the above example, Kevin was comfortable sharing the facts about his educational life with the student, both because he felt no shame or embarrassment nor any questions about the appropriateness of the content, and also because it seemed to be, in that context, of pedagogical value to do so.

Addressing a similar point about congruence within the context of psychotherapy, Schneider and Krug set a litmus test for self-revelations based on the following principle: “The guiding therapeutic question is, To what extent does encounter build the therapeutic relationship … or, on the other hand, to what extent does [it] do the opposite, and defeat or stifle facilitative process?” Similarly, in the information literacy context, we can ask ourselves, To what extent would revealing oneself facilitate the process of significant learning? To what extent would it hurt it?

There are certainly cases where Kevin sharing how much he hated school when he was younger could have negative pedagogical consequences. For example, if Kevin had told the eleventh-grade English student [discussed in Chapter Two], “Look, I hated all my English class assignments and thought my teachers didn’t ‘get it’ when I was your age too,” it could have further undermined her teacher’s authority without making any gains toward significant learning in return. For this reason, Kevin didn’t abandon being congruent, he just found a more pedagogically productive way to be real in the relationship with that student [by helping her do research that she did personally connect with].

Sharing our stories and narratives with learners is not only an effective way to encourage authenticity in students’ own research, as we saw with the narrative modeling approach discussed in chapter three, but it is also an effective way to build rapport by presenting as real, individual people. The contributions this can make to learning may often be subtle but have the potential to be profound.

-experts from Chapter Four: “Relationships: The Heart of Learner-Centered Pedagogy,” from Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice by Kevin Michael Klipfel and Dani Brecher Cook.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, On Being Human, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Quotes