Farewell to Rule Number One

Dear Readers,

We’re writing with some bittersweet news: as of April 17, 2018,  we’re going to be closing up shop here at Rule Number One. Though we plan to keep the blog up as a record of … well, the blog … we aren’t planning any new posts here.

When we started the blog – about five years ago, when we we both just out of library school – our main purpose was just to create a reason to stay in touch and work on a project together. Neither of us had any pretensions that we were doing anything but shouting out into the silences of the internet, but just in case anyone was listening, we were excited to put our perspective out there.  Never in a million years could we have anticipated what this little project turned into: articles, presentations, and the book that we recently published with the American Library Association, Learner-Centered Pedagogy.  We’ve been truly grateful (and surprised!) by the reception to our work here.

So why end Rule Number One?

We just have a sense that it’s to time to end this particular collaboration. One of our main goals for starting the blog was to get our perspective (a learner-centered approach driven by the cognitive science of learning and humanistic psychology) out there in libraries. And now we feel that we’ve done that, both here and in our book. This is not to say that we think it’s perfect, or great, or done, or that everyone has now adopted its methods and ideas and we can retire into library instruction infamy. We’re probably not even totally done with these ideas, but now we’d like to explore both these ideas and other things in new ways. We’re so psyched we got to do this together for as long as we did and we hope we’ll collaborate in different ways in the future, but this chapter feels like it’s closing.

Honestly, we’re different people at very different places in life than we were five years ago, just out of library school. There’s new jobs, spouses, kids, moves across the country… It’s been a challenge to keep up with the blog, and we feel like we’re not doing it justice anymore, with rare posts and limited engagement. We don’t want to leave it hanging, so it seems better to wrap it up.

It’s been hard to make this decision, which is why there’s been silence for so long. We feel sad, but also sort of liberated. We’re glad we’ve been able to do this thing, together, and that you’ve been kind enough to join us for the journey.

If you want to find us, you can always send us an e-mail or find us on Twitter (@danibcook and @k_m_klipfel),  and we would love it if you say hi if you ever run into us at a conference.

…And with that, we bid you a fond and grateful farewell, at least on this particular WordPress site.

We’ll see you when we see you,

Kevin and Dani

Rule # 1: A Library Blog Co-Bloggers

2012-2018

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Filed under Posts by Dani Brecher, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, The Library Game

10 Ideas for Making Your Teaching More Learner-Centered

A few weeks ago, I had the delight of facilitating a conversation with some A++ instruction librarians at ALA Midwinter (thank you, Rob, for the invitation!). I made a quick little handout on 10 ideas for making your teaching more learner-centered, and I thought it could be useful for others as well, so am sharing it here. It’s CC-BY licensed, so please feel free to reuse, remix, and share!

10ideas

(The image above is linked to the doc, or you can go directly to: https://docs.google.com/document/d/e/2PACX-1vRAuzwkoqC06Z4jlPVqEtKIs3c0ZMCMTFuP-spaEuXzzHKrB-O82ejzUaPryISmtqZs8jNQQzHFDJNC/pub)

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Filed under Bibliographic Instruction is Dead, Library Instruction, Posts by Dani Brecher

Giving Back

A few months ago, we promised to donate our proceeds from our ALA course to Planned Parenthood and United We Dream, as a small way to give back to our community. At that time, we said we’d post the receipts here, in case that was an incentive for anyone to take the class, so, with no further ado, the receipts!:

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Thanks again to all those who took our course; we had a blast, learned a lot, and look forward to offering it again!

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Teaching in Libraries: A Recommended Reading List

Last week, a colleague asked me for a few reading recommendations about library instruction. It was so fun putting together this list of things that I’ve enjoyed and that have influenced me, and a couple other folks have asked to see it, so I thought I’d share it here, lightly edited. Hope you might find it useful, and I’d love to hear about your favorite reads as well!

Library Instruction Literature

I recently read Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think about Information, edited by Troy A Swanson and Heather Jagman, and found it really useful for contextualizing the bigger picture of library instruction. I especially liked every single essay in the first part, so think it’s worth your time to read through them all!

Char Booth’s Reflective Teaching, Effective Learning blew my mind in library school as the first evidence-based library instruction book I encountered, and it’s an A+ introduction to instructional design for librarians.

I was really inspired by Anne-Marie Deitering and Hannah Gascho Rempel’s “Sparking Curiosity: Librarians’ Role in Encouraging Exploration” piece in In the Library with the Lead Pipe recently. Their coordinated approach to thinking about research as an exploration made me excited about instruction all over again.

I love everything Veronica Arellano Douglas writes about instruction, and if you aren’t already reading her blog, please do: https://veronicaarellanodouglas.com/

Pretty sure that we’ve recommended Sara Fine’s “Librarians and the Art of Helping” here before, but I’m going to recommend it again. It’s about the reference desk, but reference and instruction are really on a continuum, and there’s lots of important ideas here about question-asking and how we talk to our learners.

Barbara Fister on everything is so great: https://barbarafister.net/

I’m not the hugest fan of tooting my own horn (though I’m trying to be better about it, thanks to the encouragement of some fabulous colleagues), but I actually think you could do worse than this article that Kevin and I wrote about some concrete strategies from the cognitive science literature for library instruction.

General Teaching Literature

While this book by educational psychologist Daniel T. Willingham is meant for K-12 teachers, it’s a great and accessible intro to the science of how people learn. I own two copies, and they are both loaned out at the moment to librarian colleagues: Why Don’t Students Like School: A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions about How the Mind Works and What It Means for Your Classroom.

bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress is a classic for a reason. I’m the director of a “new” Teaching & Learning Department, and I’ve come back to this several times recently in thinking about what our community of teaching practice can and should look like (see Chapter 3: Embracing Change and Chapter 10: Building a Teaching Community).

Do Learners Really Know Best? Urban Legends in Education” is a fun and eye-opening read. We read it as a department this quarter and it led to some really fruitful and interesting discussions about challenging our assumptions about learners.

I really enjoy and value books aimed at K-12, because there’s a lot to draw on for our work with older learners too, and I recently found The Gift of Failure to be really helpful for thinking through a process-orientation to research, and how we might model that in the classroom and reference desk.

Kevin (of course) pointed me to “Engaging students in learning activities: It is not autonomy support or structure but autonomy support and structure” and I think about this literally every single time I plan a class now.

A few blogs that I follow pretty closely: Benjamin Doxtdator (http://www.longviewoneducation.org/), Hybrid Pedagogy (http://www.digitalpedagogylab.com/hybridped/), and Hack Education (http://hackeducation.com/).

…anyway, that’s my little idiosyncratic list. Let me know what you would add!

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Filed under Bibliographic Instruction is Dead, Library Instruction, Posts by Dani Brecher, The Library Game

ALA Course Update

In two weeks, we’ll begin teaching an ALA online course based on Learner-Centered Pedagogy: Principles and Practice. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been putting together the course materials, including making some videos that we hope will add a fun and personal element to the course.

As we’ve been putting this together, we’ve been thinking about everything that’s going on in the world, and how lucky we are to have salaried jobs with healthcare and stability, and we made a decision: We’re going to donate all our proceeds from the course (development and registration fees) to nonprofits that we feel are doing important and life-changing work. We’ll post our receipts here after the end of the class as a demonstration that we’ve made the donations.

We’ll be donating to:

  1. Planned Parenthood (https://www.plannedparenthood.org/)

“Planned Parenthood is a trusted health care provider, an informed educator, a passionate advocate, and a global partner helping similar organizations around the world. Planned Parenthood delivers vital reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of women, men, and young people worldwide.”

  1. United We Dream (unitedwedream.org)

“United We Dream is the largest immigrant youth led organization in the nation … We seek to address the inequities and obstacles faced by immigrant youth and believe that by empowering immigrant youth, we can advance the cause of the entire community – justice for all immigrants … United We Dream runs programs to advocate for the access to higher education: stop the deportations of undocumented youth and their parents; and strengthen alliances and support for DREAMers at the intersection of queer and immigrant rights.”

We know the course is *not* cheap, so it feels right to give back with our share of the proceeds, especially since the basic premise of our book is that people, including all their difference, matter and deserve equal rights and respect. We’re grateful to ALA for giving us the opportunity to share our work in a new format, and grateful to those who’ve signed up for the course already. We look forward to working with you in a few weeks!

-Kevin and Dani

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Filed under ...Etc., Library Instruction, Posts by Dani Brecher

Congrats, Dani!

Really nice article by UCR featuring Dani and Learner-Centered Pedagogy!

An excerpt:

“Most librarians who come out as credentialed MLSs don’t have a background in teaching, but when they come onto their job, a huge amount of their work is in teaching,” Cook explained. “We hope this book will help librarians who don’t necessarily have a background in education to put their students at the center of their work.”

Full article here.

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Filed under Education, Library Instruction, Posts by Kevin Michael Klipfel, Uncategorized

Learner-Centered Pedagogy E-Course

Dani and I are excited to announce that we’ll be partnering with ALA for a six week E-Course based on our Learner-Centered Pedagogy book, taught by … us!

The course, which is asynchronous, begins on Nov. 13, 2017. Students who register for the course will receive an electronic copy of Learner-Centered Pedagogy, and upon completion of the course will get a certificate of completion for professional development/continuing education purposes through ALA.

Here is a basic course outline:

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course, you will be able to

  • Articulate an individually developed learner-centered teaching philosophy
  • Plan and deliver a learner-centered activity for an information literacy-related outcome
  • Incorporate evidence-based practices related to autonomy, empathy, relationship rapport, and learners’ intrinsic motivation into your own reference and instructional contexts

eCourse Outline

Week 1Introduction to Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • How is learner-centered pedagogy defined and what are its theoretical and empirical bases?
  • How do we know when learning has occurred?
  • How can teacher-librarians (re)define information literacy in a learner-centered environment?

Week 2:  Facilitating Curiosity

  • How can library instructors tap into learners’ intrinsic motivation and desire for authentic self-expression to make information literacy really matter to learners?
  • Why do autonomy-supportive rather than controlling learning environments so successfully motivate learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can employ to support learners’ sense of autonomy and authenticity in the information literacy context?

Week 3: The Cognitive Science of Learning

  • What are some of the cognitive challenges that students face when learning information literacy skills?
  • How can an understanding of the cognitive science of learning improve librarians instructional design practices in and out of the classroom?
  • What are some evidence-based practical strategies librarians can take from the cognitive science of learning to better organize their instruction to help make information literacy learning stick?

Week 4: Relationships: The Heart of Learner-Centered Pedagogy

  • Why do students seem to learn best with instructors that they feel connected to?
  • How have librarians historically approached the importance of the librarian-student relationship for facilitating information literacy learning?
  • What are some evidence-based practices librarians can use to establish genuine connections and relationship rapport with learners in the information literacy context?

Week 5: Mindsets toward Learning

  • How does students’ attitudes toward the role intelligence plays in learning impact their motivation to learn?
  • How can we facilitate a process-oriented approach to research?
  • What best practices can librarians adopt from the mindset literature to help students who are experiencing roadblocks in their research?

Week 6: The Learner-Centered Technologist

  • What is technology and what role does it play in learner-centered information literacy instruction?
  • What practical test can librarians use to assess whether the use of a particular technology is learner-centered?
  • What evidence based strategies for using technology are recommended by the learner-centered pedagogy literature?

There’s a good bit more info available at the ALA site about registration, etc., but please feel free to get in touch personally with either Dani or myself if you have any questions about the content, etc.

We look forward to the possibility of working with you!

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